Logo

4 Returns

Diagnosis Report

Test Diagnose – the netherlands

Test Diagnose

Table of contents

The 4 Returns Diagnosis

The 4 Returns Framework: a short recap

Test Diagnose

Key landscape characteristics

4 Returns in Test Diagnose

Current state: Return of inspiration

Current state: Natural Returns

Current state: Social Returns

Current state: Financial Returns

Reflections on the 4 Returns Diagnosis outcomes

Potential follow-ups

Input and Contributions to this 4 Returns Diagnosis


The 4 Returns Diagnosis

The purpose of this 4 Returns Diagnosis report is to offer a comprehensive snapshot of the current status of the 4 Returns within the landscape. Its content is gathered through interviews with landscape stakeholders and, if chosen, is complemented by existing resources such as local information, literature, and reports. It’s worth noting that this diagnosis is not intended as a definitive landscape assessment report. Instead, consider it as a glimpse into the landscape, serving as a starting point for discussions to shape strategies and interventions for holistic landscape restoration.
Although the core purpose of the 4 Returns Diagnosis is to assess the current state of the 4 Returns, potential applications vary depending on the landscape’s stage and needs. These potential uses include:
  • Creating a shared understanding about the 4 Returns
  • Identifying focus areas and barriers to restoration
  • Determining the strategic direction of a holistic landscape restoration plan
  • Providing input to design pilots and interventions for holistic landscape restoration

The 4 Returns Framework: a short recap

The 4 Returns – inspiration, social, financial, natural – are used as a lens to take a holistic picture of landscape. This report provides insight into the current state of the 4 returns in this landscape, as well as the main barriers for holistic landscape restoration. In 2019, Commonland, the Landscape Finance Lab and Wetlands International, with support from the IUCN Commission on Ecosystem Management, published ‘The 4 Returns Framework for landscape restoration’. This publication presents the 4 Returns Framework for landscape restoration and describes how it could help achieve long-term success in regenerating landscapes to become living, productive and resilient landscapes. The 4 Returns Framework connects among others ecology, community values, hope and a sense of purpose, businesses, and long-term economic sustainability at landscape level. It enables government, businesses, and communities to co-create and deliver a common vision for a resilient landscape:

  • It is a conceptual and practical framework to help stakeholders achieve 4 RETURNS (inspiration, social returns, natural returns, financial returns);
  • by following five processes (5 ELEMENTS: a landscape partnership, shared understanding, landscape vision and collaborative planning, taking action, and monitoring and learning);
  • within a multifunctional landscape (3 ZONES: natural, combined and economic zones);
  • with this transformation taking place over a realistic time period (MINIMUM 20 YEARS), which corresponds to one generation.

Test Diagnose

Key landscape charactericstics

Estimated population

test

No of hectares

test

Landscape recognitions

test

Characteristic Flora and Fauna

test

Essential ecosystem services

test


4 Returns in Test Diagnose

=Natural returns
=Inspiration
=Social returns
=Financial returns

The 4 Returns diagram

The upcoming chapters will explore each Return in greater detail. However, this 4 Returns diagram might help to see the full picture, serving as a window into the landscape. Although this diagram does not provide detailed information, it offers a comprehensive view by presenting all 4 Returns at a glance. Also, this diagram could help identify potential areas of interest. For instance, there might be an unexpected score on the ‘awareness’ domain when considering the Return of Inspiration. In that case, it could be interesting to look into the factors that make up the domain ‘awareness’ and the reasons behind their notably high or low scores in the chapter dedicated to the Return of Inspiration.

Some background: how the diagrams were created

The diagrams are based on ratings provided by the involved landscape stakeholders. Each Return comprises several domains. For example, the Return of Inspiration consists of the domains ‘Awareness’, ‘Connection to the landscape’, and ‘Behavioural change’. Each domain, in turn, consists of several factors, which are described in the chapter per Return. All factors have been scored on a scale from 1 to 4, indicating their state relative to the full potential of the factor in the landscape, as derived from local stakeholder inputs. Accordingly, a full bar means that the current state of the factor or domain is ‘good’ or ‘excellent’, and an empty bar means the current state is ‘not so good’, or ‘poor’.

  • Poor
  • Not so good
  • Good
  • Excellent

 


Return of Inspiration

=Awareness
=Connection to the landscape
=Behavioral change

Return of Inspiration

The Return of Inspiration is about increased connection to the landscape and motivating stewardship. Inspired landscape stakeholders connect more deeply with oneself, each other, and the social & natural environment in the landscape and develop a purpose and intrinsic motivation to take care of the landscape.

To further operationalize the Return of Inspiration, it has been subdivided into three domains. The first domain is ‘Awareness’, referring to knowing, perceiving, and being cognizant of landscape restoration. The second domain is ‘Connection to the landscape’, which is about the relation people experience with the landscape, other people and the nature that is in the landscape. The third domain is about ‘Behavioral change’, referring to a change in practices and land use of people in the landscape. The domains are further divided into several factor, which are described in the table provided below.

Return of Inspiration: assessment of current state

AttributeFactorRateExplanation
AwarenessRestoration awareness2test
Presence of changemakers2test
Participation3test
Sources of inspiration0test
Connection to the landscapeLand stewardshiptesttest
Nature connectedness2test
Place attachment3test
Sense of hope and purpose2test
Sense of healing2etst
Behavioral changeRegeneration support & momentum2test
Adoption of improved practices3test
Replication of initiatives2test

Natural Returns

Description of the ecosystems within the landscape

Natural Returns are about increasing the health of the ecosystems in a landscape. This assessment is conducted at the biome level, as most landscapes encompass a mosaic of ecosystems and anthropogenic land use types (e.g. croplands). For the purpose of the 4 Returns diagnosis, the natural returns are assessed separately for each of the major ecosystems and land use types that can be distinguished in the landscape, following the IUCN Global Ecosystem Typology. This ecosystem classification framework comprises a nested hierarchy of units, distinguishing Realms, Biomes and Functional groups. Anthropogenically modified ecosystems/ land-use types are also incorporated into this typology. As a rule of thumb, ecosystems and land use types that cover > 5% of the landscape are assessed in the 4 Returns Diagnosis and are distinguished at Biome level.

To further operationalize Natural Returns, it has been subdivided into three domains. The first domain is assessed at the entire landscape level and is called ‘Landscape and seascape characteristics’. This domain focuses on characteristics of the entire landscape, including ecosystem diversity, connectivity, and fragmentation. The other two domains are assessed per biome: ‘Biodiversity & Ecosystems’ and ‘Ecosystem services’. However, certain ecosystem services predominantly relate to the biome level, while others have broader relevance across the entire landscape. The ecosystem services ‘Food,’ ‘Wood and other raw materials,’ and ‘Carbon sequestration and storage’ are assessed per biome, whereas ‘Water flow regulation services’ and ‘Freshwater supply’ are evaluated at the landscape level. Below, a description of the landscape characteristics and its major biomes can be found.


Landscape charactericstics

=Landscape and seascape characteristics
=Ecosystem services

Landscape characteristics: assessment of current state

AttributeFactorRateExplanation
Landscape and seascape characteristicsEcosystem diversity2asdfaf
(Hydrological) connectivity2
Fragmentation3test
Ecosystem servicesWater flow regulation services (baseflow and peakflow)2test
Freshwater supply4test

Ecosystems

test test

Corresponding realm

Marine - Terrestrial

Corresponding biome

Shoreline systems

Short description of ecosystem

test


=Biodiversity & ecosystems
=Ecosystem services

Ecosystem assessment of current state

AttributeFactorRateExplanation
Biodiversity & ecosystemsBiodiversity2test
Soil health and soil erosion1test
Water quality and hydromorphology3test
Degradation2test
Ecosystem servicesWater flow regulation services (baseflow and peakflow)2test
Freshwater supply4test

Social Returns

=Networks & learning
=Community resilience
=Social equity
=Employment

Social Returns

Social Returns are about strengthening communities in landscapes by increasing livelihood opportunities (e.g. jobs), community engagement, and social resilience.

To further operationalize Social Returns, it has been subdivided into four domains. The first domain is ‘Networks & Learning’, and is about developing and strengthening the skills, abilities, processes and resources of organizations and communities in relation to landscape restoration, and  the presence of networks consisting of interconnected and engaged people. The second domain is ‘Community resilience, which is about the sustained ability of a community to utilize available resources to respond to, withstand, and recover from adverse situations. The third domain is about ‘Social equity’, referring to inclusive and diverse participation in activities and fairness in distribution of the benefits of restoration activities. The fourth domain is called ‘Employment’ and describes the provision and quality of paid labour services.

The domains are further divided into several factor, which are described in the table provided below.

Social Returns: assessment of current state

AttributeFactorRateExplanation
Networks & learningNetwork building2test
Participation in networks2test
Level of trust2test
Knowledge development & skill development1test
Local knowledge3test
Scientific knowledge enrichment2test
Community resilienceFood security2test
Connectedness of communities & social cohesion3test
Community vulnerability to climate change2test
Basic services and infrastructure2test
Quality of life0
Social equityEquitable sharing of restoration benefits2test
Nature's contribution to people4test
Inclusive & diverse participation in restoration2test
Improved social equity3test
Human rights & gender equality1test
EmploymentJob creation2test
Equal job opportunities2test
Job satisfaction & working conditions2test

Financial Returns

=Household income
=Land user & business profitability
=Sustainable investment in landscape
=Sustainable markets
AttributeFactorRateExplanation
Household incomeHousehold income1test
Income security & diversity of income2test
Access to finance3test
Land user & business profitabilitySustainable business development3test
Business profitability2test
Bankable businesses4test
Yield & input costs3test
Access to finance4test
Complete business network3test
Economic incentives1test
Allocation profit to sustainable transition1test
Sustainable investment in landscapePublic finance mobilised3test
Private finance mobilized4test
New financial mechanisms2test
Sustainable markets(Potential) for PES1test
Access to sustainable markets2test
Sustainable market size2test
Localization of value chains2test
Certification4test

Reflections on the 4 Returns Diagnosis outcomes

Having discussed the current state of all Returns, some noteworthy factors, domains, or areas for further exploration will be highlighted. These insights come from stakeholders that contributed to this assessment. It is important not to perceive these as specific recommendations for follow-up actions, but rather as a starting point to shape the next steps, ideally within a participatory setting.

Return of Inspiration

For the Return of Inspiration, aspects or areas that caught attention based on input from consulted stakeholders and could be interesting for further exploration and discussion include:

test

Natural Returns

For Natural Returns, aspects or areas that caught attention based on input from consulted stakeholders and could be interesting for further exploration and discussion include:

test test

Social Returns

For Social Returns, aspects or areas that caught attention based on input from consulted stakeholders and could be interesting for further exploration and discussion include:

test

Financial Returns

For Financial Returns, aspects or areas that caught attention based on input from consulted stakeholders and could be interesting for further exploration and discussion include:

test

Potential follow-ups

Hopefully, the 4R Diagnosis provided a valuable window into the landscape and played a role in shaping a holistic narrative to connect ongoing activities.

Once this 4 Returns diagnosis has been validated and discussed with all intended stakeholders—possibly, with a broader stakeholder group—it is suggested to think about viable next steps in progressing towards formulating a 4 Returns landscape plan. The nature of these next steps will vary based on each landscape’s stage and particular needs. Consequently, it is neither feasible nor preferable to propose precise follow-up actions. Instead, some examples of potential follow-up workshops will be shared:

  • Organize a participatory session to prioritize focus areas [link to guidebook module]
  • Explore or design new and existing pilots or interventions [link to guidebook module]
  • Define the 3 zones in the landscape [link to guidebook module]
  • Draft a 4R vision [link to guidebook module]
  • Create a 4R landscape plan [link to guidebook module]
  • Other …

Input and Contributions to this 4 Returns Diagnosis

Stakeholders

The conduction of the 4R Diagnosis was made achievable due to the contributions and active involvement of stakeholders, significantly shaping the depth and breadth of this report. Listed below are the stakeholders and/or organizations that provided input for the 4R Diagnosis:

test

Resources

If opted for, the diagnosis has been complemented by existing resources such as local information, literature, and reports. Although there may be numerous other valuable resources available, the documents that contributed to this diagnosis are:

test

Development of the 4R Diagnosis

The 4R Diagnosis emerged from a collaborative effort involving Wetlands International, Commonland, and Landscape Finance Lab.


4 Returns Diagnose – Test Diagnose

Tag a friend?